FACULTY OF BUSINESS

Department of Business Administration

GEAR 307 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary World Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 307
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course Discussion
Q&A
Lecture / Presentation
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to contemporary world cinema. It consists of film history, key concepts in film studies and world cinema research, and questions of representation in relation to issues of gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity in a global context.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define main themes, key moments and trends in contemporary world cinema from the 1980s onwards.
  • Discuss how world cinema intervenes in debates about, and contributes new understandings to, our formulation of the local, national and the transnational in contemporary film studies.
  • Compare discourses regarding questions of representation in the context of gender, race, class and sexuality in cinema across different geographies.
  • Analyze key concepts in film studies and how they apply to world cinema.
  • Discuss meanings of the concepts of local, national and global in their wider implications to film and media studies as well as other disciplines of humanities.
  • Analyze diverse beliefs, practices, stories, and conditions within a wide range of Western and non-Western Cultures through the representations in the films.
  • Discuss film’s power to reflect, reveal, critique, and challenge cultural systems and globalization.
  • Evaluate complex relationships between national identity and transnational production.
Course Description This course combines theoretical work and the viewing of films. Students are responsible for a midterm, quiz, and participating in class.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Middle Eastern Cinema: Iran A Separation (2011) AsgharFarhadi Moore, L. C. (2005) “Women in a Widening Frame:(Cross-) Cultural Projection, Spectatorship and Iranian Cinema” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture and Media Studies, 20(2), pp. 1-33.
3 Eastern European Cinema I Screening:White God (Kornel Mundruczo 2014) Nelson, Max. (2015). “White God” Review. Film Comment, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Mar/April), pp. 68-69.
4 Western European Cinema: Denmark Jagten/The Hunt(2012) Thomas Vinterberg Luis Sáenz de VigueraErkiaga (2018) "Sacrificial Victim: Taking the Nation Apart in Thomas Vinterberg’sThe Hunt", Studies in European Cinema, 15:2-3, 162-179.
5 Western European Cinema II: UK Under The Skin (2013) Jonathan Glazer Osterweil,Ara. "Under the Skin: The Perils of Becoming Female"Film Quarterly, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Summer 2014), University of California Press. pp. 44-51.
6 Subcontinent Cinema: India Monsoon Wedding (2001) Mira Nair Larkin, B. (1997) “Indian films and Nigerian Lovers: Media and the Creation of Parallel Modernities” Africa, 67(03), pp. 406-440.
7 The Global South: Mauritania Timbuktu (2014) Abderrahmane Sissako Pasley, Victoria. (2014). “Beyond Violence in AbderrahmaneSissako’sTimbuktu” AfricanStudiesReview, 59(3), pp. 294-301.
8 Review MidTerm Exam
9 Cinema in Australia and New Zealand: Heavenly Creatures(1994) Peter Jackson Molloy, Maureen. "Death and the Maiden: The Feminine and the Nation in Recent New Zealand Films". Signs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (Autumn, 1999), University of Chicago Press. pp.153-170.
10 Korean New Wave: Parasite (2017) Bong Joon-Ho Schulze, Jonathan (2019) “The Sacred Engine and the Rice Paddy: Globalization, Genre, and Local Space in the Films of Bong Joon-ho” Journal of Popular Film and Television, 47:1, 21-29, pp. 21-29.
11 Japanese Cinema: Shoplifters (2018) HirokazuKore-eda Erlich, Linda C., (2011). “Kore-eda’s Ocean View” Film Criticism, Vol. 35, No. 2/3, pp.127–146.
12 Latin America: Argentina Wild Tales (2014) Damian Szifron Rocha, C. (2009) “Contemporary Argentine Cinema during Neoliberalism” Hispania, vol. 92 No. 4 (December) pp. 841-851.
13 Latin America: Brazil City of God (2002) Fernando Meirelles,and Katia Lund McClennen, Sophia A., (2011) “From the Aesthetics of Hunger to the Cosmetics of Hunger in Brazilian Cinema: Meirelles' City of God” Symplokē , Vol. 19, No. 1-2, pp. 95-106.
14 Course Review quiz
15 Semester Review
16 Semester Review

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

Bordwell, David, and Kristin Thompson. 2008. Film History: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
45
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
45
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
34
34
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
0
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
38
38
Final Exam
0
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to solve problems with an analytical and holistic viewpoint in the field of business administration.

2

To be able to present the findings and solutions to the business problems in written and oral formats.

3

To be able to interpret the application of business and economic concepts, and philosophies at the national and international levels.

4

To be able to use innovative and creative approach for real-life business situations.

5

To be able to demonstrate leadership skills in different business situations.

6

To be able to interpret the reflections of new technologies and softwares to business dynamics.   

7

To be able to integrate knowledge gained in the five areas of business administration (marketing, production, management, accounting, and finance) through a strategic perspective.

8

To be able to act in accordance with the scientific and ethical values in studies related to business administration.

9

To be able to work efficiently and effectively as a team member.

10

To be able to have an ethical perspective and social responsiveness when making and evaluating business decisions.

11

To be able to collect data in the area of business administration and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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