FACULTY OF BUSINESS

Department of Business Administration

GEET 202 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Multiculturalism and Globalization
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEET 202
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course -
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives Multiculturalism is one of the normative models of ‘living together’ in diverse societies. As one of the most debated political concepts of the post-Cold War era, multiculturalism has been theorized by scholars mainly for two purposes. Firstly, it establishes a critique of liberal theory of ‘impartial’ state by addressing the problems of ‘justice’ based on individualism. Among many, one significant problem is that it fails to account for the rights of minority groups. Secondly, rejecting state policies of assimilation and moving beyond policies of integration, theories of multiculturalism aim to build alternative, arguably better, idea of a ‘just society’. In this normative theory, states must sufficiently respond to the demands of inclusion and exclusion from cultural minorities and immigrants, recognize cultural difference, and consider not only individual but also group rights and needs.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • To be able to understand the basic concepts that the course builds on: political modernity; the modern state; national sovereignty; dominant and minority identity; multiculturalism; globalisation; etc
  • To be able to understand the relation between modern national sovereignties, cultural diversity and the phenomenon of globalisation in the world
  • To be able to understand the emergence of politics of multiculturalism in the world
  • To be able to explain the main examples of multicultural regimes in the world
  • To be able to explain the politics of human and minority rights within the context of multiculturalism
  • To be able to understand the complex and changing nature of culture in modernity
Course Description We are going to spend the first part of the course on the general context within which debates on multiculturalism were born. In the second part, we will discuss different approaches to multiculturalism developed by major thinkers, such as Will Kymlicka, Charles Taylor, and Jürgen Habermas. In the third part, we will turn our attention towards debates on multiculturalism in the context of globalization and the recent populist reaction to it.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course: Objectives and Expectations
2 Normative Models of ‘Living Together’ Ronald Beiner, “Liberalism, Nationalism, Citizenship: Three Models of Political Community,” in Liberalism, Nationalism, Citizenship, Toronto: UBC Press, 2003, pp. 21-38.
3 What is Multiculturalism? Ali Rattansi, Multiculturalism: A Very Short Introduction, NY: Oxford University Press, 2011, pp. 7-41.
4 Critique 1: Clash of Civilizations Samuel P. Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 72, No. 3, 1993, pp. 22-49.
5 Critique 2: ‘Impartial’ state: Liberal critique of multiculturalism Brian Barry, Culture and Equality: An Egalitarian Critique of Multiculturalism, UK: Polity, 2002, pp. 292-328
6 Midterm Exam I
7 Liberal/Thin Multiculturalism (Will Kymlicka) Frederik Stjernfelt, “Liberal Multiculturalism as Political Philosophy: Will Kymlicka,” The Monist, Vol. 95, No. 1, pp. 49-71.
8 Communitarian/Thick Multiculturalism (Charles Taylor) Charles Taylor, “The Politics of Recognition,” Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition, Taylor et al. (eds), Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994, pp. 25-73
9 Constitutional Citizenship (Jürgen Habermas) Jürgen Habermas, “Three Normative Models of Democracy,” Constellations, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1994, pp. 1-10.
10 Midterm Exam II
11 Multiculturalism and Globalization Ali Rattansi, “Conclusion: Moving On: Multiculturalism, Interculturalism, and Transnationalism in a New Global Era,” pp. 143-164.
12 Populism and the Crisis of Globalization Michael Cox, “The Rise of Populism and the Crisis of Globalization,” Irish Studies in International Affairs, Vol. 28, pp. 9-17.
13 Student Presentations I
14 Student Presentations II
15 Review
16 Review

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
2
50
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: '.16.' x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
10
2
20
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Portfolio
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
1
10
10
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
2
16
32
Final Exam
1
20
20
    Total
130

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to solve problems with an analytical and holistic viewpoint in the field of business administration.

2

To be able to present the findings and solutions to the business problems in written and oral formats.

3

To be able to interpret the application of business and economic concepts, and philosophies at the national and international levels.

4

To be able to use innovative and creative approach for real-life business situations.

5

To be able to demonstrate leadership skills in different business situations.

6

To be able to interpret the reflections of new technologies and softwares to business dynamics.   

7

To be able to integrate knowledge gained in the five areas of business administration (marketing, production, management, accounting, and finance) through a strategic perspective.

8

To be able to act in accordance with the scientific and ethical values in studies related to business administration.

9

To be able to work efficiently and effectively as a team member.

10

To be able to have an ethical perspective and social responsiveness when making and evaluating business decisions.

11

To be able to collect data in the area of business administration and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1).

12

To be able to speak a second foreign at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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